loader

Tobacco is highly addictive, and smoking is a huge daily problem for individuals all across America and throughout the globe. Many of these folks have a strong desire to quit. Of course, people mainly want to stop smoking because of the damaging effect that it has on their heart and lungs, but another strong motivator is the negative impact that smoking has on an individual’s teeth and oral health. In today’s post, we’ll explore just how smoking impacts your mouth and provide you with some useful tips for quitting today.

The Effect of Smoking on Your Mouth

Okay, so how bad is smoking for your mouth, really? The answer is: very bad. Here’s a look at some of the many ways that smoking can negatively impact your oral health:

Staining/Discoloration — The most obvious problem created by smoking is that your teeth can begin to yellow and look discolored. This staining is permanent without professional treatment, and it can make you feel self-conscious and less attractive.

Bad Breath — No one wants to be the person with stinky breath, but if you smoke, there’s a stronger chance that yours is not so pleasant.

Periodontal Disease — Smoking actually causes periodontal disease. This bacterial infection destroys soft tissue and bone that are needed to keep your teeth anchored to your jawbone. As the gums sicken and recede, you’ll notice bleeding. Over time, your teeth will become loose and you’ll experience pain. One or more of your teeth may even fall out. What’s more, tooth replacement procedures are less successful in smoker’s mouths due to existing damage.

Information and Tips for Quitting

Because tobacco is extremely addictive, quitting can be a major challenge. Before attempting to quit, it’s important that you learn all about what will be happening to you from a psychological standpoint. This is what will help you find the most success as you work to overcome cravings and any anxiety you may experience.

Your Last Cigarette — You’ll probably feel some mixed emotions when smoking your last cigarette. On one hand, you’ll feel proud of yourself for taking a step to improve your health. You might be excited about what the future holds. At the same time, though, you may also notice fear or panic setting in. This is where it’s important to remind yourself that quitting is all about taking things one step at a time.

Hours After Your Last Cigarette — At this point, you’re going to notice your first cravings beginning to kick in. Expect it and prepare ways to distract yourself, like going for a walk, seeing a movie with friends, or cleaning the house. You might also experience headaches and hunger. Again, being prepared with distracting activities, snacks, and water intake will help. Remember that the symptoms will pass soon.

Day 1 — One of the hardest parts of quitting smoking is that smoking has likely become a major part of your daily routine. We suggest playing around with your routine and shaking things up so that you aren’t hit with the urge to pick up out of habit.

Day 3 — By now, the worst should be over. Your cravings should subside significantly and you’re learning to do things a new way.

Since the first 2 weeks are the most difficult, we recommend seeking out the support of a group or a trusted friend in order to help get you through more comfortably. Your hard work WILL pay off.

Quitting smoking will prevent any future problems with your teeth, but you have have some stains or existing issues that need to be addressed. Talk to Dr. Bruce McArthur about your options for improving the look and health of your smile today.

No Comment
Read More

Anyone who has ever had a toothache can tell you that it’s not pleasant. In fact, the pain of a toothache can get so intense that it’s difficult to even think straight at times. When you experience a toothache, it means that you have an underlying problem and need to see your dentist right away before the situation gets any worse.

The question is… what is this underlying problem you’re experiencing? What we’d like to do in this two-part series is explore the top ten reasons for toothaches. We’ll start with the five most common and continue with the second set of five next week.

1. Tooth Decay

The first reason for a toothache on our list is also the most obvious. If your tooth has significant decay, then the inner layer — called the dentin — is affected. When this happens, the tooth becomes extremely sensitive to outside stimuli. The pain will often be dull, but if the decay reaches the center of the tooth, the pain will become sharp and nearly unbearable. In fact, the pain can be so bad that you’ll barely be able to function, opting instead to roll into a ball and try to ignore it. Our advice? Call your dentist!

2. Tooth Abscess

Once tooth decay has advanced to the root beneath your tooth, the pain will be widespread. This makes it difficult to determine which tooth is the source of the pain. If this happens, you must get to a dentist immediately in order to prevent the loss of bone or tissue. This is a serious issue that you can’t afford to put off any longer than you have to. You need to have a professional ascertain the problem and get it fixed right away.

3. Gum Disease

Unfortunately, millions of Americans suffer from gum disease and those numbers aren’t expected to go down anytime soon. When you experience gum disease, you may feel a dull pain in your mouth and possibly even your teeth. You need to head to your dentist right away before the damage worsens. If not, you could be looking at the loss of your teeth… and that’s obviously the last thing you want to happen.

4. Chipped or Cracked Tooth

There are several ways that a tooth can become fractured — biting down on something hard, falling down, a sports injury, etc. The pain may not happen right away, but when it does happen, you’ll know. If the damage to a fractured tooth has reached the middle of the tooth, which is where the nerves endings are located, you may be dealing with excruciating pain. We probably don’t need to tell you to head to your dentist in this situation — you’ll be screaming all the way there!

5. Temperature Sensitivity

If your tooth enamel has been worn down, your tooth may become especially sensitive to hot and cold foods and beverages because the nerves have been exposed. The first thing you can do is use a toothpaste specially formulated for sensitive teeth, which will provide protection against extreme temperatures. Then check with your dentist for further treatment before it gets any worse.

Toothaches can become unbearable if they’re not treated right away, and in some situations, are likely to cause more extensive damage the longer you wait to take care of the issue. Pay attention to the above issues and and if you’re experiencing a toothache or simply want to improve your dental health, be sure to contact the office of Dr. Bruce McArthur, DDS. We’ll take care of all your dental needs and prepare you a future of good dental and oral health!

No Comment
Read More

Dentists treat a wide variety of dental issues on a daily basis. The unfortunate truth is that many people don’t take care of their oral health in the way they should, and when they visit the dentist, they’re often shocked at the condition of their teeth and gums.

The truth is, day in and day out, most issues that are handled by dentists deal are common. Which are the most common dental issues that could easily be avoided with a little time and effort? It basically breaks down to three problems:

Cavities

We’ll start with the biggie. Cavities are the most common problems that most people are likely to develop, and are often the result of our culture’s sugar-loving lifestyle. A cavity is formed when plaque, which is full of harmful bacteria, builds up on the surface of a tooth and “eats” a hole in it. Unfortunately, your teeth do not have the ability to heal themselves, which means you’ll need to have a dentist fill it.

How can you avoid cavities? The first thing you can do is limit your intake of foods that are high in sugar, which can drastically cut down on the tendency for a cavity to form. But more importantly, it comes down to proper dental care. Develop a daily routine where you’re brushing and flossing twice a day — once in the morning and once before bed — and you’ll see less cavities. The second thing you need to do is visit your dentist once a year for a professional cleaning and exam.

Gum Disease

When plaque attacks your gums, it’s known as gum disease — or periodontal disease, if you want to get fancy (or technical). The first stage of this problem is gingivitis, where gums can become red and swollen, and will easily bleed when you brush or floss. The second stage is periodontitis, where the problem has advanced to the point where your gums will begin to shrink away from the teeth and create spaces that are prone to infection. If left untreated, tooth loss becomes a real concern.

Diabetes and hormonal change can cause gum disease, and smoking is a big contributor as well. Luckily, unlike the formation of cavities, gingivitis can be reversed with regular brushing and flossing. That being said, a visit to the dentist for a proper evaluation can help you get rid of the problem before it becomes more serious.

Enamel Erosion

Think of enamel as an invisible barrier with one job — the protection of your teeth. Unfortunately, enamel can be worn down, resulting in tooth sensitivity, discoloration, cracks, and chips. Tooth sensitivity can be a big deal, because it’s often painful, while erosion of enamel also makes you more prone to cavities.

If you’ve ever visited our blog before, you’re probably well-versed in the dangers of highly acidic food and beverages, which can eat away at your enamel. Avoiding such things, especially favorites like high-fructose sodas, will go a long way to ensure your enamel’s survival. Other ways to protect enamel include drinking water throughout the day to wash away any acid, in addition to brushing with a fluoride toothpaste and soft-bristed toothbrush on a regular basis.

Teeth are essential for a good life, and that’s why it’s so important to take care of them. Brushing and flossing twice a day, in the proper manner, can go a long way to ensuring dental health, and visiting a dentist at least once a year is a great way to keep things going strong. If you’d like to know more about steps you can take or need to set up an appointment, contact Dr. Bruce McArthur, DDS, and he’ll put you on the path to quality dental and oral care.

No Comment
Read More